Building A Three Season Room

A three season room can be a really great investment for your home. This addition really allows for the enjoyment of the great outdoors without exposing you to the elements. It’s an investment that gives a maximum return.  

When you decide to install a three season room, there are a few things that you should consider. First, you’ll need to estimate the costs of building the room. How much you’ll spend varies based on the finishes that you choose, the materials used, and the area of the country that you live in.

Estimates

When you undertake any kind of home improvement project you should obtain estimates first. This way, you’ll have an idea of just how much the project will cost. Contractors will also give you an idea of how they will go about completing the project in order to meet your needs. It’s a good idea to know how much demolition is needed and how long the project will take. This will vary by contractor.

Think Of Using Existing Structures

Using existing structures on your home can really help to cut down the cost of building a three season room. Your current porch or deck area may even have the ability to be enclosed. If the structures are sound, it’s a great option. Remember that a three season room needs glass, a sturdy floor, screens and windows to be complete! 

Match The Roof


You’ll want to match the roof of your three season/sunroom with the existing roof of your home. Choose from a variety of styles from simple to the elaborate. Just be sure that the new roofing doesn’t stick out too much. You can even add a skylight in the new addition to let more light in. 

The Estimate

You want to be sure that you get an accurate estimate for building your three season room. The contractor should include all of the following areas in the estimate:

  • The foundation
  • The frame
  • Electrical
  • Molding
  • Drywall
  • Skylights
  • Windows
  • Doors
  • Screens
  • Fans
  • HVAC hookups

It should be noted that along with building materials, the cost of labor should be included along with the estimate. Carpenters charge a set rate per hour as do electricians and plumbers. You’ll most likely need a few different contractors in order to complete your three season room, so take that into account. 

No matter what part of the country that you live in, you will always be happier if you maximize your enjoyment of the outdoors. Completing a 3 season room can help you and your family to enjoy nature all year round.

What Does That Mean – Mortgage Type

Multiple options are available when it comes to real estate loans. Figuring out which one you need can be disconcerting, to say the least. So, if you’re new to the game, here’s a quick guide to help you along. 

Standard Mortgages:

  • Conventional – Loans that fall within the FNMA/FHLMC (Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac) guidelines where the Federal government is not insuring the payment through the VA or FHA loan process are known as conventional loans. A conventional loan has either a fixed or an adjustable interest rate, and typically requires ten to twenty percent downpayment.
  • Conforming – When a loan conforms to guidelines set by FNMA/FHLMC (Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac) where either Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac could later purchase the loan, it is said to be conforming. A non-conforming loan would be any loan that does not fit the guidelines, so a Jumbo Loan, for example, would be outside the scope of FNMA/FHLMC because of its size.
  • FHA Insured – Loans that are insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) are made to borrowers meeting specific criteria and often require lower down payments.
  • VA – American military personnel and veterans may obtain a mortgage through the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) as typically preferred interest rates and/or no or lower down payments.

Specialty Mortgages:

  • Reverse Annuity – This particular mortgage is for seniors on a fixed income and is used to generate monthly revenue from the equity in their home. They continue to live in the house as they like, but ownership reverts to their lender once they move from the home or pass away.
  • Wrap around – Sometimes, a homeowner needs to sell, but chooses to keep a preferential mortgage on the home, so the buyer pays a mortgage payment that covers both the original mortgage and the amortized difference between the existing mortgage and the selling price. The seller is considered to have loaned the “wrap around” amount to the buyer.
  • Balloon – A balloon mortgage is a loan with a short (three years, perhaps) term that has a fixed principal and interest monthly payment that typically is not fully amortized. At the end of the term, the rest of the mortgage is due in a single (balloon) payment at which time buyers typically refinance. These loans are useful for buyers that intend to sell within the balloon period at an appreciation value (such as for a longer fixer-upper), or who could not qualify for a conventional loan at the time but expect that situation to change during the length of the mortgage.
  • Graduated Payment – Sometimes a loan is structured so that earlier payments are lower than later payments and the payments increase on a scheduled basis.
  • Refinance – A refinance is a mortgage taken out to replace an existing mortgage. Homeowners sometimes add more money from the home’s equity onto the loan to complete home improvements.

Short-Term Home Loans:

In addition to full mortgages, there are several short-term loans that homeowners may take in special situations. These include bridge loans (between buying and selling on contingency), construction loans, non-recourse loans (rare, and when the buyer has no responsibility for payment), and home equity loans or lines of credit based on the value difference between the amount owed on the home and its current fair market value.

If you’re wondering what type loan is right for you, speak to a mortgage professional about your situation and get pre-approved.

4 Home Improvement ideas You Can Take on To Increase The Value Of Your Home

When it comes to real estate, then the value of your house is everything. While some things that affect its value that you can’t influence, such as the location or even the spending power of that market, there are a couple of things that you can take on to significantly raise the value of your home. If you are looking to sell your house sometime in the future, these are not such expensive things that you can start doing now, so that you can get a better deal whenever you are ready to sell.

  1. Make It More Appealing: How does your home look from across the street? Are potential buyers going to want to take a second look? Invest in a fresh coat of paint to make it look appealing. Freshly painted homes have a way of looking attractive to the eye, and that’s where the value comes in. You can also look at getting rid of old carpets and long-standing odors and allergens.
  2. Do Some Landscaping: Plant bushes and shade trees around your premises if you can—they help make a place look more desirable, plus you can reduce cooling costs too. If trees look like too much work, get low maintenance shrubs and colorful plants around—make sure you ask for drought resistant ones so that you spend less on water and maintenance. You should also clean up your lawn and any other overgrown bushes you have around your property. If you can’t spare the time, hire a lawn service company to do it.
  3. Make It Bigger: It’s pretty obvious, the bigger your house, the more valuable it is. You can add a room to it or build a top deck. Buyers always notice things like that. Square footage isn’t all that matters, increase the visual footage too, so it looks bigger to the eye. Use blinds to allow light in, since a sunny room looks more substantial. Clear the clutter and all the old junk you don’t need any longer too.
  4. Make It More Energy Efficient: An energy efficient home will not only save you money now, but it will also make it more attractive to buyers in the future. Consider using air sealing and insulation improvements, or LED lighting and double-paned windows as they can make it check all the boxes for energy-conscious buyers.

If you’re not sure what will make the most impact on the value of your home, check with your local real estate specialist.