Mix It Up! Using Prints with Patterns Confidently

Early attempts at dressing where you arrived in a striped top and polka-dot bottoms may not have earned your rewards when you were little. In fact, it may have put you off mixing patterns at all. After all, playing it safe with solids and neutrals is much less intimidating. But in your home, all that seamlessness leaves you somewhat uninspired. Here are simple, and less angst-causing ways to mix it up in your home.

Throw pillows:

Add life to the party with one stripe and one floral or geometric in similar or coordinating colors. If you want a display bolder look, use contrasting colors such as a bright red stripe with a chartreuse green geometric against your gray sofa. Or pick one large print and one small print in the same or reverse colors. Then, add a third pattern such as a stripe or plaid to pull it all together.

Change up the fabrics and textures too. Put a crisp black canvas or duck weave with a soft green and blue velour print. Or mix a paisley pattern with stripes or blocks. The variety draws the eye to multiple places and can even camouflage a dated sofa or chair.

Carpets:

Mix up your carpet styles too. If you have a traditional carpet pattern in the living room, liven it up with an overlapping sea-grass weave in high traffic areas. Place florals and paisleys within eyesight of each other or put a bold stripe in the entry to the living area.

Blankets:

Mix up those plaid plush blankets with a lovely vintage granny-square crocheted afghan or hang a hand-made quilt over the arm of a pattered high-back chair. 

Vintage pieces:

Experiment with mixing different wood colors and textures too. Place a Victorian table in a dark wood next to a mid-century arm or slipper chair with light legs. Lean a decorative brass screen against the fireplace next to a glass urn from a completely different era. Stack re-discovered suitcases as a side table and set a modern lamp with a mod-print shade on top.

The thing about mixing stripes and patterns or delicate prints with geometrics is that is the balance can come from either the design or the piece. So, a large cushion in a subtle pattern next to a smaller one with a bold stripe works because neither one outdoes the other. The key is to pick things you like, then balance them with other items that share a color or feature or are their direct opposite on the color wheel.

Reasons To Sell Your Home Now

As the new year approaches, you may wonder what changes are ahead for you and your family. If you have been thinking about selling your home in the coming year, there are a few pretty good reasons to do so. Read on, and you may find some new real estate goals for the new year. 

There’s Not A Lot Of Inventory

If the inventory is low, you’ll find that it’s a great time to put your home on the market. Your home will sell a bit faster and attract more buyers. If the market is particularly busy, you may get an even better price than expected for your home. 

People Want Homes Fast

Certain times of year bring a bit more urgency to the market. Employees may be more apt to have transfers within their company. Families may be looking to move in before the start of the school year. These situations can get your home off the market fast for the right price.

The Seasons Of Real Estate Are Different

While we typically think of spring as starting in late March, spring in the real estate world actually begins in January. Once the holidays are over, it’s believed that people are ready to make moves with their properties. This early season holds especially true in warmer climates. It’s thought that the earlier in the year a home is listed, the more it will stand out on the market. If you’re listing a house in a warmer climate, keep in mind that people who are looking to escape cold climates are looking to buy in the early months of the year.  

Keep in mind that if you do live in a colder climate and plan to sell and your property has some great outdoor space, you may want to wait until a warmer time of year to sell. 

The Lower The Price Of The Home The Faster It Moves

If your home is on the lower end of the price spectrum, you may be able to sell whenever you’d like., These home are attractive to first-time buyers and move fast off the market. They’re great for starter homes, fixer uppers, and house flippers.

The bottom line is that in a hot market there may be no wrong time to sell. If you speak with a REALTOR® and they believe the time is right, and you’re itching to move on to another property you should. Real estate agents have the knowledge and experience that can help you to find the right time to sell as well as the sweet spot for pricing your home.   

    

Hacks to Go Green in Your Home – Saving Energy

The fight to sustain planet earth has gone beyond the responsibility of just a few to the responsibility of all inhabitants. Diminishing energy sources, limited human resources, pollution, and other environmental concerns sit at the top of the to-do list of every country across the globe. Experts have awakened to the need to sustain planet earth and unearthed little hacks that would play a role or two in the sustenance of the environment. Fortunately, going green does not have to cost you much money or time. Little hacks to your daily routine can add up quickly to a substantial change in the ecosystem. 

Here are three little green living hacks that can help you protect your family and the environment.

Go for EnergyStar-Rated Appliances

A report from the United States Energy Information Administration stated that an average American home incurs about $112.59/month as electricity bill. Worse, this ridiculous amount does not include natural gas and other transportation costs. To reduce the excess energy consumed in your home, experts advise that you opt for EnergyStar-rated appliances designed to complete the same task with a minimum amount of energy.

Save Energy with LED and CFL Lights

Replacing the traditional incandescent bulbs with light-emitting diode (LED) and compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) bulbs is yet another good way to save energy and protect the environment. LED and CFL provide many advantages over incandescent bulbs. LED and CFL bulbs utilize seventy-five percent less energy than do traditional bulbs—and, they emit less heat as well. Furthermore, they last longer than incandescent bulbs, which means saving the environment and a few bucks too.

Save Water with High-Efficiency Showerhead

Yes, water covers seventy-five percent of the earth, but our homes use only about one percent. A large percentage of earth’s water resides in oceans and is too salty for at home use. A substantial amount of earth’s water, located in aquifers beneath the ground, is also inaccessible by humans. Unfortunately, human activities pollute the small percentage of clean water made available for use daily. And the unpolluted fraction does not have a means for conservation, which is why experts recommend high-efficiency showerheads designed to save up to three thousand (3,000) gallons of water per person each year.

Adding energy-efficient fixtures and light bulbs to your home can increase its value. Ask your local realtor about high-efficiency homes available in your area.

Factors to Note Before Purchasing a Vacation Property

If you are mulling over purchasing a vacation home, then you must go over a few considerations before you make the final decision. If done for the right reasons, it can end up being a great piece of investment, as you can save hotel and lodging costs when you visit and then rent it out during off seasons.

  1. Location. Location is essential because you can’t just up and move at will, so consider the area of the property you are contemplating purchasing thoroughly. Will the site accessible and attractive to future guests? Is it located in a place that is prone to natural disasters like hurricanes and storms?
  2. Calculate the associated costs. Many other costs come along with purchasing a piece of property such as utilities, maintenance, homeowner association costs, property taxes, and insurance fees. You want to factor all this and determine that they are well within your budget. If you plan on using rental income to cover some of these costs, then you have to be practical about what rental income typically is in that area.
  3. Maintenance Issues. If you are buying that vacation property as an investment, then you have to make arrangements for who is going to manage it in your absence. Things like security and surveillance are critical. The speed at which you repair a bad pipe or faulty wiring may be the final defense between your house going up in flames or flooding. If you aren’t around for long periods, plan to hire a facility manager who can supervise affairs.
  4. Finances. Run a money check with your financial adviser. Get someone to look at other tax issues such as buying out of state property. You might find that property taxes on that new place may not be deductible. Are you going to be able to meet up with your other long term financial commitments?
  5. Local laws. It’s always necessary to run checks on local laws and regulations about homes in the place you choose. Make sure you hire a local property professional too as they are likely to be more thorough. Are you going to be allowed to rent it out, and are there regulations on the number of days it can be rented out?

Whatever you do, make sure you cover all your bases and consult with our realtor before you sign the final contract.